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Aristophanes

The English or modern Aristophanes. Samuel Foote (1722–1777). The French Aristophanes. J. Baptiste Poquelin de Molière (1622–1673). Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable…

The Congress of Women

by Mrs. Julia Ward Howe The Nineteenth CenturyNeedlework as Taught in StockholmWomen in the Greek Drama Mrs. Julia Ward Howe is a native of New York City. She was born May 27, 1819. Her pare…

The Devil's Dictionary

by Ambrose Bierce FRIENDSHIPFRYING-PANFROG -n. A reptile with edible legs. The first mention of frogs in profane literature is in Homer's narrative of the war between them and the mice. Sk…

Aristocracy

The cold shade of the aristocracy—i.e. the unsympathising patronage of the great. The expression first occurs in Sir W. F. P. Napier's History of the Peninsular War. The word “a…

Aristotle

Aristotle of China. Tehuhe, who died A.D. 1200, called the “Prince of Science.” Aristotle of the nineteenth century. Baron Cuvier, the great naturalist (1769–1832). Sour…

Crotalum

A sort of castanet,rattled in dancing. Aristophanes calls a great talker krotalon (a clack). Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894CrotchetCrossing the Line A B C…

Nephelo-coccygia

A town in the clouds built by the cuckoos. It was built to cut off from the gods the incense offered by man, so as to compel them to come to terms. (Aristophanes: The Birds.) “Without…

City of the Violet Crown

Athens is so called by Aristophanes iostefauoz (see Equites, 1323 and 1329; and Acharnians, 637). Macaulay refers to Athens as the “violet-crowned city.” Ion (a violet) was a re…