Cite
 

Meaning of secure

se•cure

Pronunciation: (si-kyoor'), [key]
— adj., v., -cur•er, -cur•est, -cured, -cur•ing.
—adj.
  1. free from or not exposed to danger or harm; safe.
  2. dependable; firm; not liable to fail, yield, become displaced, etc., as a support or a fastening: The building was secure, even in an earthquake.
  3. affording safety, as a place: He needed a secure hideout.
  4. in safe custody or keeping: Here in the vault the necklace was secure.
  5. free from care; without anxiety: emotionally secure.
  6. firmly established, as a relationship or reputation: He earned a secure place among the baseball immortals.
  7. sure; certain; assured: secure of victory; secure in religious belief.
  8. safe from penetration or interception by unauthorized persons: secure radio communications between army units.
  9. overconfident.
—v.t.
  1. to get hold or possession of; procure; obtain: to secure materials; to secure a high government position.
  2. to free from danger or harm; make safe: Sandbags secured the town during the flood.
  3. to effect; make certain of; ensure: The novel secured his reputation.
  4. to make firm or fast, as by attaching: to secure a rope.
    1. to assure payment of (a debt) by pledging property.
    2. to assure (a creditor) of payment by the pledge or mortgaging of property.
  5. to lock or fasten against intruders: to secure the doors.
  6. to protect from attack by taking cover, by building fortifications, etc.: The regiment secured its position.
  7. to capture (a person or animal): No one is safe until the murderer is secured.
  8. to tie up (a person), esp. by binding the person's arms or hands; pinion.
  9. to guarantee the privacy or secrecy of: to secure diplomatic phone conversations.
—v.i.
  1. to be or become safe; have or obtain security.
  2. The crew was ordered to secure for sea.
    1. to cover openings and make movable objects fast:The crew was ordered to secure for sea.
    2. to be excused from duty:to secure from general quarters.
Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.
See also: