Meaning of challenge

chal•lenge

Pronunciation: (chal'inj), [key]
— n., v., adj. -lenged, -leng•ing,
—n.
  1. a call or summons to engage in any contest, as of skill, strength, etc.
  2. something that by its nature or character serves as a call to battle, contest, special effort, etc.: Space exploration offers a challenge to humankind.
  3. a call to fight, as a battle, a duel, etc.
  4. a demand to explain, justify, etc.: a challenge to the treasurer to itemize expenditures.
  5. difficulty in a job or undertaking that is stimulating to one engaged in it.
  6. the demand of a sentry for identification or a countersign.
  7. a formal objection to the qualifications of a particular juror, to his or her serving, or to the legality of an entire jury. Cf. peremptory challenge.
  8. the assertion that a vote is invalid or that a voter is not legally qualified.
  9. the process of inducing or assessing physiological or immunological activity by exposing an organism to a specific substance.
  10. the crying of a hound on finding a scent.
—v.t.
  1. to summon to a contest of skill, strength, etc.
  2. to take exception to; call in question: to challenge the wisdom of a procedure.
  3. to demand as something due or rightful.
  4. to halt and demand identification or countersign from.
  5. to take formal exception to (a juror or jury).
  6. to have a claim to; invite; arouse; stimulate: a matter which challenges attention.
  7. to assert that (a vote) is invalid.
  8. to assert that (a voter) is not qualified to vote.
  9. to expose an organism to a specific substance in order to assess its physiological or immunological activity.
  10. to lay claim to.
—v.i.
  1. to make or issue a challenge.
  2. (of hounds) to cry or give tongue on picking up the scent.
—adj.
  1. donated or given by a private, corporate, or government benefactor on condition that the recipient raise an additional specified amount from the public: a challenge grant.
Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.
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