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Teachers' feelings of preparedness


Teachers in the 2000 survey reported the extent to which they felt prepared for the overall demands of their teaching assignments and for eight specific classroom activities. The survey data indicate that:

  • Sixty-one percent of public school teachers felt very well prepared to meet the overall demands of their teaching assignments. Thirty-five percent felt moderately well prepared, and 4 percent felt somewhat well prepared.
  • Teachers most often reported feeling very well prepared to maintain order and discipline in the classroom (71 percent). They were less likely to report feeling very well prepared to implement new methods of teaching (45 percent), implement state or district curriculum (44 percent), use student performance assessment (37 percent), address the needs of students from diverse cultural backgrounds (32 percent), and integrate educational technology into the grade or subject taught (27 percent).
  • Among teachers who taught students with special needs, relatively few felt very well prepared to address those students' needs. Twenty-seven percent of teachers indicated that they felt very well prepared to address the needs of students with limited English proficiency, and 32 percent of the teachers who taught students with disabilities felt very well prepared to address those students' needs.
  • The extent to which teachers felt very well prepared for most classroom activities varied with the amount of time spent in recent professional development in those activities. With two exceptions (classroom management and state or district curriculum and performance standards), teachers who spent over 8 hours in professional development on the activity were more likely than those who spent 1 to 8 hours or those who did not participate at all to indicate that they felt very well prepared for that activity.
  • For three collaborative activities related to teaching–regularly scheduled collaboration with other teachers, networking with teachers outside the school, and mentoring another teacher in a formal relationship–teachers who participated in the activity were more likely than those who did not participate to report feeling very well prepared for the overall demands of their classroom assignments.
  • Student, teacher, and classroom characteristics

    Across most industrialized nations, the range of student/teacher ratios is wide at both the elementary and secondary levels. The United States has a higher-than-average student/teacher ratio than the other G-7 countries.

    Schools in the United States allocated as much or more instructional time than most other countries in terms of overall hours of education, minutes of subject instruction in mathematics and science per week, and frequency of lessons.

    The United States had a greater incidence of child poverty than its G-7 counterparts. One-fifth of all U.S. children lived in poverty after the effects of government taxes and transfers in 1991 were taken into account, compared with just over 13 percent in Canada, about 10 percent in the United Kingdom, and less than 7 percent in France.

    The majority of elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States and in most other G-7 nations are female. However, in Germany and Japan, approximately three-quarters of secondary school teachers are male. While it takes 15 to 17 years of education to become a teacher in most nations, Germany and Japan maintain more extensive mentoring and training systems for new teachers than the United States.

    The estimates in this publication are key statistics reported during the 2000—01 school year. They include the number of students in membership, teachers, and high school graduates for public elementary and secondary schools, and total revenues and expenditures for the operation of public elementary and secondary schools. Highlights of these statistics include the following:

    • There were approximately 47.2 million prekindergarten through grade 12 students in the nation’s public elementary and secondary schools in fall 2000, compared with 46.9 million in fall 1999. Student membership has increased by 1.5 million since fall 1996 (table 1).
    • Public school students were taught by an estimated 3.0 million teachers in school year 2000—01 (table 2).
    • The student membership and teacher count data show a pupil/teacher ratio of 16.0 for grades prekindergarten through 12 for public schools in school year 2000—01 (table 7).
    • An estimated 2.5 million public school students graduated from high school in the 1999—2000 school year. In the 2000—01 school year, 2.5 million students are expected to graduate from high school (table 3).
    • Revenues for public elementary and secondary education in fiscal year (FY) 2000 are estimated to be $364.0 billion, and they are expected to rise to approximately $384.7 billion in FY 2001 (table 4).
    • Current expenditures for public elementary and secondary education for FY 2001 are estimated to be $333.8 billion, an increase of 4.6 percent over the FY 2000 estimate of $319.2 billion. The per pupil expenditure is anticipated to be $7,079 per student in membership for the 2000—01 school year (table 5 and table 7).
    • Washington, D.C. - America's teachers did not reap the rewards of increased investment in public education during the 1990s, according to a report released today by the National Education Association (NEA), the nation's largest professional employee organization. To read the full report, visit http://www.nea.org/publiced/edstats/rankings/02rankings.pdf.

      Teachers' salaries increased by 3 percent during the decade spanning from 1991-2001 when adjusted for inflation. This increase works out to an average annual rate of 0.3 percent a year, according to NEA's report Rankings and Estimates 2000-2001. During this same period, school revenue receipts, total expenditures, and per-pupil expenditures increased significantly.

      Other facts in Rankings and Estimates:

      • The average salary of a U.S. public school teacher for the school year 2000-01 was $43,335 - with more than 30 states below the average. The highest ranking states in teacher pay were New Jersey, Connecticut, and California. The lowest were Mississippi, North Dakota, and South Dakota.
      • The average per-pupil expenditure for the 2000-01 school year was $7,161 with 29 states below the average. The highest ranking states were the District of Columbia, New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey. The lowest were Arizona, Utah, and North Dakota.
      • SCHOOLS:

        TOTAL NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS: 14,891

        TOTAL NUMBER OF K-12 SCHOOLS: 118,464
        Elementary: 81,812
        Secondary: 26,205
        Combined Schools: 10,447

        TOTAL NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS: 91,062
        Elementary: 65,189
        Secondary: 23, 718
        Combined: 2,155

        TOTAL NUMBER OF CHARTER SCHOOLS: 2,357

        TOTAL NUMBER OF PRIVATE SCHOOLS: 27,402
        Elementary: 16,623
        Secondary: 2,487
        Combined: 8,292

        TOTAL NUMBER OF CATHOLIC SCHOOLS: 8,144 Elementary: 6,923
        Secondary: 1,221
        Combined: N/A

        ENROLLMENT:

        TOTAL K-12: 51,610,806
        Elementary: 36,168,631
        Secondary: 13,989,239
        Combined: 1,452,937

        TOTAL PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: 46,534,678
        Elementary: 33,343,787
        Secondary: 13,190,900

        TOTAL CHARTER SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: 579,880

        TOTAL PRIVATE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: 5,076,119
        Elementary: 2,824,844
        Secondary: 798,339
        Combined: 1,452,937

        TOTAL CATHOLIC SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: 2,500,416 Elementary: 1,877,236 Secondary: 623,180

        TEACHERS:

        TOTAL: 3,284,000 Elementary: 2,014,000 Secondary: 1,270,000

        TOTAL PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS: 2,887,000 Elementary: 1,733,000 Secondary: 1,154,000

        TOTAL CHARTER SCHOOL TEACHERS: 36,019

        TOTAL PRIVATE SCHOOL TEACHERS: 397,000 Elementary: 281,000 Secondary: 116,000

        TOTAL CATHOLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS: 144,642 Elementary: 97,692 Secondary: 40,226 Combined: 6,724

        STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO:

        PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO
        Elementary: 17.6:1
        Secondary: 14.1:1

        CHARTER SCHOOL STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO: 16:1

        PRIVATE SCHOOL STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO
        Elementary: 16.4:1
        Secondary: 11.5:1

        CATHOLIC SCHOOL STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO
        Elementary: 18.7:1
        Secondary: 15:1
        Combined: 11.2:1

        EXPENDITURES:

        TOTAL PUBLIC SCHOOL EXPENDITURES: $334.3 billion
        Current Expenditures: $285.5 billion
        Instruction: $176.5 billion
        Student Services: $96.5 million
        Food Services: $11.7 billion
        Enterprise Operations: $776.4 million
        Capital Outlay: $36.2 billion
        Interest on School Debt: $7.8 billion
        Other Current Expenditures: $4.8 billion

        AVERAGE PUBLIC SCHOOL PER PUPIL EXPENDITURE: $6,662

        AVERAGE PRIVATE SCHOOL TUITION: $3,116
        Elementary: $2,138
        Secondary: $4,578
        Combined: $4,266

        AVERAGE CATHOLIC SCHOOL TUITION: $2,178
        Elementary: $1,628
        Secondary: $3,643
        Combined: $4,153

        SALARIES AND WAGES:

        PUBLIC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS:
        District Superintendent: $112,158
        Associate Superintendent: $97,251
        Assistant Superintendent: $88,913

        PUBLIC SCHOOL PRINCIPALS:
        High School: $79,839
        Middle School/Junior High: $77,382
        Elementary School: $72,587

        PUBLIC SCHOOL ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS:
        High School: $60,999
        Middle School/Junior High: $63,706
        Elementary School: $59,080

        PUBLIC SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL:
        Counselor: $48,195
        Librarian: $46,732
        School Nurse: $35,540

        AVERAGE TEACHER BASE SALARY:
        Public School: $41,820
        Private School: $33,220
        Catholic School: $21,898

        PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPPORT STAFF SALARIES:
        Clerk/Office Positions:
        Secretaries/Stenographer: $28,540
        Accounting Payroll: $24,560
        Clerk/Typist: $23,200

        SCHOOL BUILDING LEVEL:
        Secretary/Stenographer: $22,650
        Library Clerks: $16,980

        HOURLY WAGE RATES:

        Teacher Aides:
        Instructional: $10.00
        Specialized:
        Custodians: $11.35
        Cafeteria Workers: $9.02
        School Bus Driver¹s: $12.48

        PERCENTAGE OF SCHOOL EMPLOYEES BY CATEGORY:

        Teachers: 52.2 percent
        Aides: 10.8 percent
        School Staff: 7.9 percent
        Support Staff: 4.4 percent
        Other Staff: 20.2 percent

        FUNDING:

        TOTAL FUNDING OF PUBLIC EDUCATION: $325,976,011,000
        Federal: $22.2 billion (6.8% of total)
        State: $157.6 billion (48.4% of total)
        Local: $137.8 billion (42.3% of total)
        Private: $8.3 billion (2.6% of total)


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