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Sinatra, Frank

Sinatra, Frank (Francis Albert Sinatra), 1915–98, American singer and actor, b. Hoboken, N.J. During the late 1930s and early 40s he sang with the Harry James and Tommy Dorsey bands, causing teenage girls to shriek and swoon over his romantic, seemingly casual renditions of such songs as I'll Never Smile Again and This Love of Mine. During his long career he became one of the most successful pop music figures of the century, widely respected as a singer's singer for his richly detailed readings of lyrics and his versatile and nuanced musical style. Sinatra's sophisticated musicianship was evident in his many recordings. He had a long-lived and successful movie career, appearing in 58 films including On the Town (1949), From Here to Eternity (1953, Academy Award), Guys and Dolls (1955), Pal Joey (1957), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), and The Detective (1968). He also directed and produced several films. Sinatra retired from show business in 1971 but returned in several concert tours.

See A. I. Lonstein and V. R. Marino, The Revised Compleat Sinatra (1980) and R. Peters, The Frank Sinatra Scrapbook (1982); K. Kelley, His Way (1986) and J. Kaplan, Frank: The Voice (2010) and Sinatra: The Chairman (2015); W. Friedwald, Sinatra! The Song Is You (1995), S. Petkov and L. Mustazza, ed., The Frank Sinatra Reader (1995), P. Hamill, Why Sinatra Matters (1998), and T. Santopietro, Sinatra in Hollywood (2008).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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