| Share
 

Saguenay

Saguenay (săgˈənā, săgˌənāˈ) [key], river, c.125 mi (200 km) long, S Que., Canada. It issues from Lac Saint Jean, or Lake Saint John (c.375 sq mi/970 sq km), in two channels, the Grande Décharge and the Petite Décharge, separated by the Île d'Alma, and flows generally SE past St. Joseph d'Alma, Arvida, and Chicoutimi, to the St. Lawrence River at Tadoussac. Navigable below Chicoutimi, it flows through a picturesque gorge whose banks rise to more than 1,500 ft (457 m) at Eternity and Trinity capes. The Peribonca River is its chief tributary. The Saguenay was first visited (1535) by Cartier, and Champlain explored its lower reaches in 1603. For more than three centuries it was a route traveled by explorers, missionaries, and fur traders; later it became a major lumber transportation route and the approach to noted hunting and fishing areas. In the 20th cent. pulp and paper mills and important hydroelectric stations (especially those at Shipshaw and Chute à Caron) were built on the banks of the river and some of its tributaries, and at Jonquière is one of the world's largest aluminum plants. Excursions up the Saguenay by steamer from Quebec have long been a tourist attraction.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

More on Saguenay from Infoplease:

See more Encyclopedia articles on: Canadian Physical Geography


Premium Partner Content
HighBeam Research
Documents Images and Maps Reference
(from Newspapers, Magazines, Journals, Newswires, Transcripts and Books)

Research our extensive archive of more than 80 million articles from 6,500 publications.

Additional search results provided by HighBeam Research, LLC. © Copyright 2005. All rights reserved.

24 X 7

Private Tutor

Click Here for Details
24 x 7 Tutor Availability
Unlimited Online Tutoring
1-on-1 Tutoring