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Riverside

Riverside. 1 City (1990 pop. 226,505), seat of Riverside co., S Calif.; inc. 1883. One of the fastest growing U.S. cities in the late 20th cent., it is famous for its orange industry. The navel orange was introduced there in 1873; the original tree, still producing, is a tourist attraction. The first marketing cooperative, organized in Riverside in 1892, led to the founding of the California Fruit Growers Exchange. Other products include aircraft and aerospace components, aluminum, food and beverages, plastics, prefabricated wood and metal buildings, medical equipment, electronic devices, motor vehicle parts, and machinery. The city is the seat of the Univ. of California at Riverside (with a citrus research center, est. 1907), La Sierra Univ., California Baptist Univ., and a school for Native Americans. Mission Inn, a hotel in a unique mission setting, is in the city. March Air Reserve Base and the March Field Air Museum are to the southeast. 2 Village (1990 pop. 8,774), Cook co., NE Ill., a residential suburb of Chicago, on the Des Plaines River; inc. 1875. It was planned as a model suburb by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. The city has a number of buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The old water tower (late 19th cent.) is a national historic landmark.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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