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Gaston Lachaise

Lachaise, Gaston (gästôNˈ läshĕzˈ) [key], 1882–1935, American sculptor, b. Paris. After studying in Paris, he emigrated to the United States in 1906. For 12 years he worked in Boston and New York City, chiefly for the sculptors H. H. Kitson and Paul Manship, who employed him to execute details on some of their commissions. Lachaise made decorations for the RCA (now GE) Building, 45 Rockefeller Plaza, and other New York City structures. Perhaps his most famous works, however, are single figures, such as his Standing Woman (Mus. of Modern Art, New York City), which has monumental charm and extraordinary vitality.

See studies by H. Kramer et al. (1967) and G. Nortland (1974).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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