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Sudan

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Facts & Figures

National name: Jamhuryat as-Sudan

President: Lt. Gen. Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir (1989)

Current government officials

Total area: 1,156,673 sq mi (1,861,484 sq km)

Population (2014 est.): 35,482,233 (growth rate: 1.78%); birth rate: 30.01/1000; infant mortality rate: 52.86/1000; life expectancy: 63.32; density per sq mi: 42.4

Capital (2011 est.): Khartoum, 4.632 million

Largest cities: Omdurman, 2,395,159; Port Sudan, 489,275

Monetary unit: Dinar

More Facts & Figures

Flag of Sudan
Index
  1. Sudan Main Page
  2. A Brief Respite From Civil War
  3. Humanitarian Disaster in Darfur
  4. Atrocities Continue, Even as the International Community Pushes for Peace
  5. Bashir Wins Election in a Landslide
  6. Historic Vote in Southern Sudan
  7. North and South on the Brink of War
  8. Oil Pipeline Deal Achieved

Geography

Sudan, in northeast Africa, measures about one-fourth the size of the United States. Its neighbors are Chad and the Central African Republic on the west, Egypt and Libya on the north, Ethiopia and Eritrea on the east, and South Sudan, Kenya, Uganda, and Democratic Republic of the Congo on the south. The Red Sea washes about 500 mi of the eastern coast. It is traversed from north to south by the Nile, all of whose great tributaries are partly or entirely within its borders.

Government

Military government.

History

What is now northern Sudan was in ancient times the kingdom of Nubia, which came under Egyptian rule after 2600 B.C. An Egyptian and Nubian civilization called Kush flourished until A.D. 350. Missionaries converted the region to Christianity in the 6th century, but an influx of Muslim Arabs, who had already conquered Egypt, eventually controlled the area and replaced Christianity with Islam. During the 1500s a people called the Funj conquered much of Sudan, and several other black African groups settled in the south, including the Dinka, Shilluk, Nuer, and Azande. Egyptians again conquered Sudan in 1874, and after Britain occupied Egypt in 1882, it took over Sudan in 1898, ruling the country in conjunction with Egypt. It was known as the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan between 1898 and 1955.

The 20th century saw the growth of Sudanese nationalism, and in 1953 Egypt and Britain granted Sudan self-government. Independence was proclaimed on Jan. 1, 1956. Since independence, Sudan has been ruled by a series of unstable parliamentary governments and military regimes. Under Maj. Gen. Gaafar Mohamed Nimeiri, Sudan instituted fundamentalist Islamic law in 1983. This exacerbated the rift between the Arab north, the seat of the government, and the black African animists and Christians in the south. Differences in language, religion, ethnicity, and political power erupted in an unending civil war between government forces, strongly influenced by the National Islamic Front (NIF) and the southern rebels, whose most influential faction is the Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA). Human rights violations, religious persecution, and allegations that Sudan had been a safe haven for terrorists isolated the country from most of the international community. In 1995, the UN imposed sanctions against it.

On Aug. 20, 1998, the United States launched cruise missiles that destroyed a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility in Khartoum which allegedly manufactured chemical weapons. The U.S. contended that the Sudanese factory was financed by Islamic militant Osama bin Laden.

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