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Clark, November 10, 1805

November 10th Sunday 1805 rained verry hard the greater part of the last night & Continus this morning, the wind has layed and the Swells are fallen. we loaded our Canoes and proceeded on, passed a Deep Bay on the Stard. Side I Call ____ The wind rose from the N W. and the Swells became So high, we were Compelled to return about 2 miles to a place where we Could unld. our Canoes, which was in a Small Bay on Driftwood, on which we had also to make our fires to dry our Selves as well as we could the Shore being either a Clift of Purpendicular rocks or Steep assents to the hight of 4 or 500 feet, we continued on this drift wood untill about 3 oClock when the evening appearing favourable we loaded & Set out in hopes to turn the Point below and get into a better harber, but finding the waves & Swells continue to rage with great fury below, we got a Safe place for our Stores & a much beter one for the Canoes to lie and formed a Campment on Drift logs in the Same little Bay under a high hill at the enterence of a Small drean which we found verry convt. on account of its water, as that of the river is Brackish- The logs on which we lie is all on flote every high tide- The rain Continud all day- we are all wet, also our beding and many other articles. we are all employed untill late drying our bedding. nothing to eate but Pounded fish