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Clark, June 28, 1806

Saturday June 28th 1806

This morning we Colected our horses and Set out as usial after an early brackfast. we continued our rout along the dividig ridge over knobs & through deep hollows passed our encampmt of the 14 Sept. last near the forks of the road leaving the one on which we had Came one leading to the fishery to our right imediately on the dividing ridge. at 12 oClock we arived at an untimberd side of a mountain with a southern aspect just above the fishery here we found an abundance of grass for our horses as the guids had informed us. as our horses were hungary and much fatiegued and from information no other place where we could obtain grass for them within the reach of this evening's travel we deturmined to remain at this place all night haveing come 13 m. only. the water was distant from our Encampment we therefore melted Snow and used the water. the whole of the rout of this day was over deep Snow. we find the travelling on the Snow not worse than without it, as easy passage it givs us over rocks and fallen timber fully compensates for the inconvenience of sliping, certain it is that we travel considerably faster on the snow than without it. the Snow Sinks from 2 to 3 inches with a horse, is course and firm and seems to be formed of the larger particles the surface of the snow sees to be rather harder in the morning than after the Sun Shines on it a fiew hours, but it is not in that situation so dense as to prevent the horses from obtaining good foothold. I killed a Small black pheasant; this bird is generally found in the Snowey region of the mountains and feeds on the leaves of the pine & fir. there is a Species of Small huckleberry common to the hights of the mountains, and a Species of grass with a broad succulent leaf which looks not unlike a flag; of the latter the horses are very fond, but as yet it is generally under the Snow, or mearly makeing it's appearance as it confined to the upper part of the highest mountains.