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window

(Encyclopedia) window, in architecture, the casement or sash, fitted with glass, which closes an opening in the wall of a structure without excluding light and air. It may have a square, round, or?

rose window

(Encyclopedia) rose window, large, stone-traceried, circular window of medieval churches. Romanesque churches of both England and the Continent had made use of the wheel window?a circular window?

Brewer's: Shot Window

(A) - i.e. shot-out or projecting window, and not, as Ritson explains the word, a ?window which opens and shuts.? Similarly, a projecting part of a building is called an out-shot. The?

Poem: Morning at the Window

Poem 16 Poem 18 Morning at the Window They are rattling breakfast plates in basement kitchens, And along the trampled edges of the street I am aware of the damp souls of housemaids?

Poems: Morning at the Window

by T. S. Eliot Rhapsody on a Windy NightThe Boston Evening TranscriptMorning at the Window They are rattling breakfast plates in basement kitchens, And along the trampled edges of the?

Brewer's: Aladdin's Window

To finish Aladdin's Window?i.e. to attempt to complete something begun by a great genius, but left imperfect. The genius of the lamp built a palace with twenty-four windows, all but one?

Brewer's: Dormer Window

The window of an attic standing out from the slope of the roof. (O. French, dormeor =a sleeping room formerly fitted with windows of this kind.) ?Thatched were the roofs, with dormer?

Brewer's: Window

(Norwegian, vindue.) A French window opens like folding doors; a sash window is in two parts, called sashes, one or both of which are made to?

Brewer's: Jesse Window

(A). A stained-glass window representing Jesse recumbent, and a tree shooting from him containing the pedigree of Jesus. Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer,?