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Whitman, Walt

(Encyclopedia) Whitman, Walt (Walter Whitman), 1819–92, American poet, b. West Hills, N.Y. Considered by many to be the greatest of all American poets, Walt Whitman celebrated the…

Rostow, Walt Whitman

(Encyclopedia) Rostow, Walt Whitman, 1916–2003, U.S. economist and government official, brother of Eugene Rostow , b. New York City. A Yale Ph.D. (1940) and Rhodes scholar, he…

Whitman

(Encyclopedia) Whitman, town (1990 pop. 13,240), Plymouth co., SE Mass., S of Boston; settled c.1670, set off from Abington and inc. 1875. It is an industrial town that manufactures…

Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman was a 19th century writer whose life's work, Leaves of Grass, made him one of the first American poets to gain international attention. Walt Whitman spent most of his young life in…

Walt Whitman: Calamus

CalamusIn Paths UntroddenScented Herbage of My BreastWhoever You Are Holding Me Now in HandFor You, O DemocracyThese I Singing in SpringNot Heaving from My Ribb'd Breast OnlyOf the Terrible…

Walt Whitman: By the Roadside

By the RoadsideA Boston Ballad [1854]Europe [The 72d and 73d Years of These States]A Hand-MirrorGodsGermsThoughtsWhen I Heard the Learn'd AstronomerPerfectionsO Me! O Life!To a PresidentI Sit…

Walt Whitman: Inscriptions

InscriptionsOne's-Self I SingAs I Ponder'd in SilenceIn Cabin'd Ships at SeaTo Foreign LandsTo a HistorianTo Thee Old CauseEidolonsFor Him I SingWhen I Read the BookBeginning My…

Walt Whitman: To a Historian

To a HistorianYou who celebrate bygones, Who have explored the outward, the surfaces of the races, the life that has exhibited itself, Who have treated of man as the creature of politics…

Walt Whitman: Eidolons

Eidolons I met a seer, Passing the hues and objects of the world, The fields of art and learning, pleasure, sense, To glean eidolons. Put in thy chants said he, No more the…

Walt Whitman: Beginners

BeginnersHow they are provided for upon the earth, (appearing at intervals,) How dear and dreadful they are to the earth, How they inure to themselves as much as to any—what a paradox…