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Brewer's: Acu tetigisti

You have hit the nail on the head. (Lit., you have touched it with a needle.) Plautus (Rudens, v 2, 19) says, “Rem acu tetigisti;” and Cicero (Pro Milone, 24) has “Vulnu…

Brewer's: Dromio

The brothers Dromio. Two brothers exactly alike, who serve two brothers exactly alike, and the mistakes of masters and men form the fun of Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors, based on the Men&#…

Brewer's: Euclio

A penurious old hunks in one of the comedies of Plautus (Aulularia). Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894EucratesEucharist A B C D E F G H I J K L M …

Brewer's: Flying without Wings

(No). Nothing can be done without the proper means. “Sine pennis volare haud facile est.” Plautus. Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894Flyman's PlotF…

Brewer's: Gonnella's Horse

Gonnella, the domestic jester of the Duke of Ferrara, rode on a horse all skin and bone. The jests of Gonnella are in print. “His horse was as lean as Gonnella's, which (as the Duke s…

Brewer's: Menechmians

Persons exactly like each other, as the brothers Dromio. So called from the Menæchmi of Plautus. In the Comedy of Errors, not only the two Dromois are exactly like each others, but als…

Brewer's: All to break (Judges ix. 53).

“A certain woman cast a piece of millstone upon Abimelech's head, and all to brake his skull” does not mean for the sake of breaking his skull, but that she wholly smashed his sku…

Brewer's: Bos

[ei] in lingua. He is bribed to silence; he has a coin (marked with a bull's head) on his tongue. Adalardus, in Statutis Abbatiæ Corbeiensis (bk. i. c. 8), seems to refer to the bos a…

Brewer's: Crux

(A). A knotty point, a difficulty. Instantia crucis means a crucial test, or the point where two similar diseases crossed and showed a special feature. It does not refer to the cross, an in…