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Plautus

(Encyclopedia) Plautus (Titus Maccius Plautus) plô´təs [key], c.254–184 BC, Roman writer of comedies, b. Umbria. His plays, adapted from those of Greek New Comedy, are popular and…

Warner, William

(Encyclopedia) Warner, William, 1558?–1609, English poet. A lawyer educated at Oxford, he wrote Pan his Syrinx (1584), translated Plautus's Menaechmi (1595), and…

Diphilus

(Encyclopedia) Diphilus dĭf´ĭləs [key], fl. 300 BC, Greek dramatist of the New Comedy, b. Sinope. His many dramas (perhaps 100) were extensively adapted by Plautus and Terence and…

Menander

(Encyclopedia) Menander mĭnăn´dər [key], 342?–291? BC, Greek poet, the most famous writer of New Comedy. He wrote ingenious plays using the love plot as his theme; his style is elegant…

Udall, Nicholas

(Encyclopedia) Udall, Nicholas, 1505–56, English dramatist, educated at Oxford. He was headmaster of Eton (1534–41) and of Westminster School (from 1554). His one extant play,…

Terence

(Encyclopedia) Terence (Publius Terentius Afer) tĕr´əns [key], b. c.185 or c.195 BC, d. c.159 BC, Roman writer of comedies, b. Carthage. As a boy he was a slave of Terentius Lucanus, a…

Regnard, Jean François

(Encyclopedia) Regnard, Jean François zhäN fräNswä´ rənyär´ [key], 1655–1709, French comic dramatist. He traveled widely in Europe; captured by Barbary pirates, he was held in slavery…

auk

(Encyclopedia) auk ôk [key], common name for a member of the family Alcidae (alcid family), swimming and diving birds of the N Atlantic and Pacific, which includes the guillemots and…

farce

(Encyclopedia) farce, light, comic theatrical piece in which the characters and events are greatly exaggerated to produce broad, absurd humor. Early examples of farce can be found in…

Latin literature

(Encyclopedia) Latin literature, the literature of ancient Rome and of that written in Latin in later eras. Very little remains of the ritualistic songs and the native poetry of…