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Cuckoo

A cuckold. The cuckoo occupies the nest and eats the eggs of other birds; and Dr. Johnson says “it was usual to alarm a husband at the approach of an adulterer by calling out `Cuckoo,…

Nest

To feather one's nest. (See Feather.) Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894Nest-eggNessus A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y…

Feather One's Nest

He has feathered his nest well. He has made lots of money; has married a rich woman. The allusion is to birds, which line their nests with feathers to make them soft and warm. Source: Dic…

Over

(Greek, huper; Latin, super; German, über; Anglo-Saxon, ofer Over in cricket, means that the fielders are to go over to the other side. This is done when five balls have been delive…

Mare's Nest

To find a mare's nest is to make what you suppose to be a great discovery, but which turns out to be all moonshine. Why dost thou laugh? What mare's nest hast thou found? Beaumont and Fletc…

Over and on the Sea

Over and on the Sea One of the next major advancements in human flight came in response to a contest sponsored by The Daily Mail of London, which offered a prize to the first aviator to fly ac…

Come Over One

(To). To wheedle one to do or give something. (Anglo-Saxon, ofer-cuman, to overcome.) To come over one is in reality to conquer or get your own way. Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable…

Come Yorkshire over One

(To). To bamboozle one, to overreach one. Yorkshire has always been proverbial for shrewdness and sharp practice. “I's Yorkshire too” means, I am 'cute as you are, and am not to…

Crow over One

(To), is to exult over a vanquished or abased person. The allusion is to cocks, who always crow when they have vanquished an adversary. Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham B…

Cuckoo-Spit

“Frog-Spit,” or “Froth-Spit.” The spume which forms the uidus of an insect called the Cicada Spumaria, or, more strictly speaking, the Cercopis Spumaria (one of the …