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Aeschylus

Although little is known for certain about his life, ancient Athenian Aeschylus has come down to us through history as one of the greatest early dramatists and "the father of Greek tragedy." He wrote…

Æschylus

Ees′-ke-lus the most sublime of the Greek tragic poets. He wrote 90 plays, only 7 of which are now extant. Æschylus was killed by a tortoise thrown by an eagle (to break the shell…

Æschylus of France

Æs′chylus Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon. (1674–1762.) Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894AesculapiusAeschylus A B C D E F G H I J K …

Sophocles

Sophocles was a Greek dramatist whose long career came between his contemporaries Aeschylus and Euripides. A respected public figure of Athens, he was both a priest and a general (an elected position…

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Name at birth: Elizabeth BarrettAfter anonymously publishing a book of poetry and a translation of Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, Elizabeth Barrett published The Seraphim and Other Poems in 1838 under h…

Aerians

Ae′rians Followers of Aerius, who maintained that there is no difference between bishops and priests. Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894AeschylusAerated Wa…

Æsculapius

Æscula′pius The Latin form of the Greek word Asklepios, the god of medicine and of healing. Now used for “a medical practitioner.” Source: Dictionary of Phrase and F…

Robert Lowell

Robert Lowell was one of the most influential American poets to reach fame in the post-World War II era, the winner of two Pulitzers and a National Book Award, and the author of the collections Lord W…