Walt Whitman: Starting from Paumanok, Part 7

Part 7

I am the credulous man of qualities, ages, races, I advance from the people in their own spirit, Here is what sings unrestricted faith.
Omnes! omnes! let others ignore what they may, I make the poem of evil also, I commemorate that part also, I am myself just as much evil as good, and my nation is—and I say     there is in fact no evil, (Or if there is I say it is just as important to you, to the land or     to me, as any thing else.)
I too, following many and follow'd by many, inaugurate a religion, I     descend into the arena, (It may be I am destin'd to utter the loudest cries there, the     winner's pealing shouts, Who knows? they may rise from me yet, and soar above every thing.)
Each is not for its own sake, I say the whole earth and all the stars in the sky are for religion's sake.
I say no man has ever yet been half devout enough, None has ever yet adored or worship'd half enough, None has begun to think how divine he himself is, and how certain     the future is.
I say that the real and permanent grandeur of these States must be     their religion, Otherwise there is just no real and permanent grandeur; (Nor character nor life worthy the name without religion, Nor land nor man or woman without religion.)