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Presidential Vetoes, 1789-2015

PresidentCoincident
Congresses
Regular
vetoes
Pocket
vetoes
Total
vetoes
Vetoes
overridden
Washington1st-4th2-2-
Adams5th-6th----
Jefferson7th-10th----
Madison11th-14th527-
Monroe15th-18th1-1-
J. Q. Adams19th-20th----
Jackson21st-24th5712-
Van Buren25th-26th-11-
W. H. Harrison27th----
Tyler27th-28th64101
Polk29th-30th213-
Taylor31st----
Fillmore31st-32nd----
Pierce33rd-34th9-95
Buchanan35th-36th437-
Lincoln37th-39th257-
A. Johnson39th-40th2182915
Grant41st-44th4548934
Hayes45th-46th121131
Garfield47th----
Arthur47th-48th48121
Cleveland49th-50th3041104142
B. Harrison51st-52nd1925441
Cleveland53rd-54th421281705
McKinley55th-57th63642-
T. Roosevelt57th-60th4240821
Taft61st-62nd309391
Wilson63rd-66th3311446
Harding67th516-
Coolidge68th-70th2030504
Hoover71st-72nd2116373
F. D. Roosevelt73rd-79th3722636359
Truman79th-82nd1807025012
Eisenhower83rd-86th731081812
Kennedy87th-88th12921-
L. B. Johnson88th-90th161430-
Nixon91st-93rd2617437
Ford93rd-94th48186612
Carter95th-96th1318312
Reagan97th-100th3939789
G.H.W. Bush1101st-102nd2915441
Clinton103rd-106th361372
G. W. Bush107-110th100103
Barack Obama111th-11433
Total 1,4941,0662,560109
1. President Bush attempted to pocket veto two bills during intrasession recess periods. Congress considered the two bills enacted into law because of the president's failure to return the legislation. The bills are not counted as pocket vetoes in this table.
Source: Office of the Clerk of the House. Web: http://clerk.house.gov .

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