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Jarrell, Randall

Jarrell, Randall jərĕl´ [key], 1914–65, American poet and critic, b. Nashville, Tenn., grad. Vanderbilt Univ. (B.A., 1935 M.A., 1938). His poetry, reflecting an unusually sensitive and tragic view of life, includes Blood for a Stranger (1942), The Seven-League Crutches (1951), and The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960). His best-known poem, The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner, was a mediation on his experiences during World War II. In 1953 his critical essays were collected and published as Poetry and the Age. Jarrell's other works include several delightful children's books Pictures from an Institution (1954), a satirical novel set in a progressive women's college and A Sad Heart at the Supermarket (1962), a collection of essays and fables.

See his complete poems (1969) posthumous collections of his criticism and essays, The Third Book of Criticism (1969), Kipling, Auden & Co. (1980), and No Other Book (ed. by B. Leithauser, 1999) his letters (ed. by M. Jarrell, 1985) memoir by his wife, Mary Jarrell (1999) studies by R. Lowell et al., ed. (1967), C. Beck (1983), J. Bryant (1986), and S. Burt (2003) bibliography by S. Wright (1986).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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