Meaning of lodge

lodge

Pronunciation: (loj), [key]
— n., v., lodged, lodg•ing.
—n.
  1. a small, makeshift or crude shelter or habitation, as of boughs, poles, skins, earth, or rough boards; cabin or hut.
  2. a house used as a temporary residence, as in the hunting season.
  3. a summer cottage.
  4. a house or cottage, as in a park or on an estate, occupied by a gatekeeper, caretaker, gardener, or other employee.
  5. a resort hotel, motel, or inn.
  6. the main building of a camp, resort hotel, or the like.
  7. the meeting place of a branch of certain fraternal organizations.
  8. the members composing the branch: The lodge is planning a picnic.
  9. any of various North American Indian dwellings, as a tepee or long house. Cf. earth lodge.
  10. the Indians who live in such a dwelling or a family or unit of North American Indians.
  11. the home of a college head at Cambridge University, England.
  12. the den of an animal or group of animals, esp. beavers.
—v.i.
  1. to have a habitation or quarters, esp. temporarily, as in a hotel, motel, or inn: We lodged in a guest house.
  2. to live in rented quarters in another's house: He lodged with a local family during his college days.
  3. to be fixed, implanted, or caught in a place or position; come to rest; stick: The bullet lodged in his leg.
—v.t.
  1. to furnish with a habitation or quarters, esp. temporarily; accommodate: Can you lodge us for the night?
  2. to furnish with a room or rooms in one's house for payment; have as a lodger: a boardinghouse that lodges oil workers.
  3. to serve as a residence, shelter, or dwelling for; shelter: The château will lodge the ambassador during his stay.
  4. to put, store, or deposit, as in a place, for storage or keeping; stow: to lodge one's valuables in a hotel safe.
  5. to bring or send into a particular place or position.
  6. to house or contain: The spinal canal lodges and protects the spinal cord.
  7. to vest (power, authority, etc.).
  8. to put or bring (information, a complaint, etc.) before a court or other authority.
  9. to beat down or lay flat, as vegetation in a storm: A sudden hail had lodged the crops.
  10. to track (a deer) to its lair.

Lodge

Pronunciation: (loj), [key]
— n.
  1. 1850–1924, U.S. public servant and author: senator 1893–1924.
  2. his grandson,1902–85, U.S. journalist, statesman, and diplomat.
  3. 1851–1940, English physicist and writer.
  4. 1558?–1625, English poet and dramatist.
Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.
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