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Meaning of hammer

ham•mer

Pronunciation: (ham'ur), [key]
—v.t.
  1. to beat or drive (a nail, peg, etc.) with a hammer.
  2. to fasten by using hammer and nails; nail (often fol. by down, up, etc.): We spent the day hammering up announcements on fences and trees.
  3. to assemble or build with a hammer and nails (often fol. by together): He hammered together a small crate.
  4. to shape or ornament (metal or a metal object) by controlled and repeated blows of a hammer; beat out: to hammer brass; to hammer a brass bowl.
  5. to form, construct, or make with or as if with a hammer; build by repeated, vigorous, or strenuous effort (often fol. by out or together): to hammer out an agreement; to hammer together a plot.
  6. to produce with or by force (often fol. by out): to hammer out a tune on the piano; to hammer a home run.
  7. to pound or hit forcefully: to hammer someone in the jaw.
  8. to settle (a strong disagreement, argument, etc.); bring to an end, as by strenuous or repeated effort (usually fol. by out): They hammered out their differences over a glass of beer.
  9. to present (points in an argument, an idea, etc.) forcefully or compellingly; state strongly, aggressively, and effectively (often fol. by home).
  10. to impress (something) as if by hammer blows: You'll have to hammer the rules into his head.
    1. (in the London stock exchange) to dismiss (a person) from membership because of default.
    2. to depress the price of (a stock).
—v.i.
  1. to strike blows with or as if with a hammer.
  2. to make persistent or laborious attempts to finish or perfect something (sometimes fol. by away): He hammered away at his speech for days.
  3. to reiterate; emphasize by repetition (often fol. by away): The teacher hammered away at the multiplication tables.

Ham•mer

Pronunciation: (ham'ur), [key]
  1. 1898–1990, U.S. businessman and art patron.
Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.
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