Meaning of bargain

bar•gain

Pronunciation: (bär'gun), [key]
— n.
  1. an advantageous purchase, esp. one acquired at less than the usual cost: The sale offered bargains galore.
  2. an agreement between parties settling what each shall give and take or perform and receive in a transaction.
  3. such an agreement as affecting one of the parties: a losing bargain.
  4. something acquired by bargaining.
  5. an agreeable person, esp. one who causes no trouble or difficulty (usually used in negative constructions): His boss is no bargain.
  6. over and above what has been stipulated; moreover; besides: The new housekeeper proved to be a fine cook in the bargain.
  7. to make a bargain; agree to terms: They were unable to strike a bargain because the owner's asking price was more than the prospective buyer could afford.
—v.i.
  1. to discuss the terms of a bargain; haggle; negotiate.
  2. to come to an agreement; make a bargain: We bargained on a three-year term.
—v.t.
  1. to arrange by bargain; negotiate: to bargain a new wage increase.
  2. to anticipate as likely to occur; expect (usually fol. by a clause): I'll bargain that he's going to give those company directors plenty of trouble.
  3. to anticipate or take into account: The job turned out to be more than he had bargained for.
  4. to expect or anticipate; count or rely on: You can't bargain on what she'll do in this situation.
Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.
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