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What to Read While You're Waiting for the Next Harry Potter:

Favorites from Other Fantastic Series

by Holly Hartman

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Harry Potter wasn't the first child to discover he possessed magical powers, or the first to become entangled in a battle of Good vs. Evil. Check out the classic books in this list for more fantasy, suspense, and wicked humor. Best yet, each is part of a series, and you won't have to wait a year for the next installment.

  • The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander (U.S., 1964)
    When evil threatens the mythical land of Prydain, a young pig-keeper named Taran must face the monstrous Horned King.
  • The Dark Is Rising by Susan Cooper (England, 1973)
    On his eleventh birthday, Will Stanton discovers that he possesses ancient powers.
  • Five Children and It by E. Nesbit (England, 1902)
    Five children encounter a hideous, cranky creature that grants their wishes--for better or for worse.
  • Half Magic by Edward Eager (U.S., 1954)
    What looks like an old coin on the sidewalk turns out to be a quirky magic talisman.
  • The House with a Clock in Its Walls by John Bellairs (U.S., 1973)
    The shy orphan Lewis Barnavelt learns that his uncle's mansion harbors a deadly secret.
  • The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C. S. Lewis (England, 1952)
    Edmund, Lucy, and their vile cousin Eustace enter a magic painting of a sailing ship and join the quest of a legendary king.
  • The Weirdstone of Brisingamen by Alan Garner (England, 1960)
    Wizards and goblins are among the unearthly figures lurking in a remote and mysterious part of England.
  • A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. LeGuin (U.S., 1968)
    A young boy is chosen to enroll at a school for wizards, where he learns the language of magic and dragons.
  • The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken (England, 1962)
    Two cousins plot a dramatic escape from the orphanage run by evil Miss Slighcarp.
  • A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle (U.S., 1960)
    Otherworldly visitors guide Meg and her brother Charles Wallace on a journey through time and space.



Did you know?  Prior to 1979, only female names were used to name hurricanes. That year, the United States began alternating between male and female names for Atlantic hurricanes.