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Government Officials

Cabinet Members with Dates of Appointment

Cabinet Members Under Washington

Cabinet Members Under J. Adams

Cabinet Members Under Jefferson

Cabinet Members Under Madison

Cabinet Members Under Monroe

Cabinet Members Under J. Q. Adams

Cabinet Members Under Jackson

Cabinet Members Under Van Buren

Cabinet Members Under W. H. Harrison

Cabinet Members Under Tyler

Cabinet Members Under Polk

Cabinet Members Under Taylor

Cabinet Members Under Fillmore

Cabinet Members Under Pierce

Cabinet Members Under Buchanan

Cabinet Members Under Lincoln

Cabinet Members Under A. Johnson

Cabinet Members Under Grant

Cabinet Members Under Hayes

Cabinet Members Under Garfield

Cabinet Members Under Arthur

Cabinet Members Under Cleveland (First Term)

Cabinet Members Under B. Harrison

Cabinet Members Under Cleveland (Second Term)

Cabinet Members Under McKinley

Cabinet Members Under T. Roosevelt

Cabinet Members Under Taft

Cabinet Members Under Wilson

Cabinet Members Under Harding

Cabinet Members Under Coolidge

Cabinet Members Under Hoover

Cabinet Members Under F. D. Roosevelt

Cabinet Members Under Truman

Cabinet Members Under Eisenhower

Cabinet Members Under Kennedy

Cabinet Members Under L. B. Johnson

Cabinet Members Under Nixon

Cabinet Members Under Ford

Cabinet Members Under Carter

Cabinet Members Under Reagan

Cabinet Members Under G. H. W. Bush

Cabinet Members Under Clinton

Cabinet Members Under G. W. Bush

Cabinet Members Under Barack Obama

Although the Constitution made no provision for a president's advisory group, the heads of the three executive departments (State, Treasury, and War) and the attorney general were organized by Washington into such a group; and by about 1793, the name “cabinet” was applied to it. With the exception of the attorney general up to 1870 and the postmaster general from 1829 to 1872, cabinet members have been heads of executive departments.

Cabinet members are appointed by the president, subject to the confirmation of the Senate; and as their terms are not fixed, they may be replaced at any time by the president. At a change in administration, it is customary for cabinet members to resign, but they remain in office until successors are appointed.

The table of cabinet members lists only those members who actually served after being duly commissioned. The dates shown are those of appointment. “Cont.” indicates that the term continued from the previous administration for a substantial amount of time.

With the creation of the Department of Transportation in 1966, the Cabinet consisted of 12 members. This figure was reduced to 11 when the Post Office Department became an independent agency in 1970 but, with the establishment in 1977 of a Department of Energy, became 12 again. Creation of the Department of Education in 1980 raised the number to 13. Creation of the Department of Veterans' Affairs in 1989 raised the number to 14. The establishment of the Department of Homeland Security in 2002 brought the number to 15.


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