| Share
 

Cariboo Mountains

Cariboo Mountains (kărˈĭbō) [key], range, c.200 mi (320 km) long, E British Columbia, Canada, rising to 11,750 ft (3,582 m) at Mt. Sir Wilfrid Laurier. It runs roughly parallel with the main Rocky Mt. range to the northeast, from which it is separated by the Rocky Mt. Trench, there occupied by the Fraser River. In the foothills to the west is the Cariboo dist., scene of the famous Cariboo gold rush of 1860. Many camps sprang up in the region, and much gold was taken out, but after 1866 the diggings declined. Many gold-seekers stayed on in the region, and today there are several thousand who make their living by a combination of mining, hunting, and farming. The Cariboo wagon road, built (1862–65) by the government, facilitated the settlement of the interior of the province. It started from Yale, at the head of navigation on the Fraser River, and ended in the Cariboo dist. nearly 400 mi (640 km) to the north. Bowron Lake and Wells Gray provincial parks are in the Cariboo Mts.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

More on Cariboo Mountains from Infoplease:

See more Encyclopedia articles on: Canadian Physical Geography


Premium Partner Content
HighBeam Research
Documents Images and Maps Reference
(from Newspapers, Magazines, Journals, Newswires, Transcripts and Books)

Research our extensive archive of more than 80 million articles from 6,500 publications.

Additional search results provided by HighBeam Research, LLC. © Copyright 2005. All rights reserved.

24 X 7

Private Tutor

Click Here for Details
24 x 7 Tutor Availability
Unlimited Online Tutoring
1-on-1 Tutoring