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abortion

History of Abortion

Abortion induced by herbs or manipulation was used as a form of birth control in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome and probably earlier. In the Middle Ages in Western Europe it was generally accepted in the early months of pregnancy. However, in the 19th cent. opinion about abortion changed. In 1869 the Roman Catholic Church prohibited abortion under any circumstances. In England and in the United States in the 19th cent. stringent antiabortion laws were passed.

Attitudes toward abortion became more liberal in the 20th cent. By the 1970s, abortion had been legalized in most European countries and Japan; in the United States, under a 1973 Supreme Court ruling (see Roe v. Wade), abortions are permitted during the first six months of pregnancy. Abortion remains a controversial issue in the United States, however, and in 1977 Congress barred the use of Medicaid funds for abortion except for therapeutic reasons and in certain other specified instances. Several state legislatures passed restrictive abortion laws in hope that the Supreme Court would overturn Roe v. Wade, but in 1992 the court reaffirmed the basic principles of the 1973 decision. Nonetheless a number of states have continued to enact restrictions on abortion or abortion clinics in attempts to end abortions.

From 1995 to 2000 the U.S. Congress repeatedly passed, but President Bill Clinton vetoed, a bill that would ban a rare late-term method of abortion called by its critics "partial-birth abortion." Subsequent attempts by many U.S. states to ban this method were contested in the courts, and in 2000 the Supreme Court voided such laws that do not include an exception when the health of the mother is endangered. A federal bill banning the procedure was passed again in 2003 and signed into law by President George W. Bush. The law was quickly challenged in the courts, and a federal judge declared it unconstitutional in 2004 in part because of its lack of a health exception, but the Supreme Court, with two new conservative members appointed by President Bush, upheld the law in 2007. U.S. opponents of abortion have used more militant tactics at times in attempts to disrupt the operations of facilities that perform abortions, and a few extremists have resorted to bombings and assassination. In India, the abortion of female fetuses by couples desiring a male child led (1994) to criminal penalties for prenatal testing when done solely to determine the sex of the fetus; such tests have been banned in parts of China for the same reason.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

More on abortion History of Abortion from Infoplease:

  • abortion: History of Abortion - History of Abortion Abortion induced by herbs or manipulation was used as a form of birth control ...
  • abortion - abortion abortion, expulsion of the products of conception before the embryo or fetus is viable. ...

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