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Bolesław Prus

Prus, Bolesław (bôlĕsläfˈ prōs) [key], 1845?–1912, Polish writer, whose original name was Alexander Głowacki. Prus is considered a founder of the modern Polish novel. His articles and short stories exposed the prejudice and class pride in Poland and urged the creation of a sober, cooperative, and industrious society. Prus's realistic novels include The Outpost (1886, tr. 1921), about the struggle of a Polish peasant to hold his lands, The Emancipated Women (4 vol., 1894), and The Pharaoh (1897, tr. 1902). The Doll (1890, tr. 1972), Prus's finest work, presents a broad picture of middle-class life in Warsaw.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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