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Henry Cabot Lodge

Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850–1924, U.S. senator (1893–1924), b. Boston. He was admitted to the bar in 1876. Before beginning his long career in the U.S. Senate he edited (1873–76) the North American Review, was lecturer (1876–79) on American history at Harvard, and edited (1880–81) the International Review with John Torrey Morse. He was (1880–81) a member of the Massachusetts house of representatives and was (1887–93) a U.S. congressman. He also wrote some historical works, as well as biographies of his great-grandfather George Cabot (1877), of Alexander Hamilton (1882), of Daniel Webster (1883), and of George Washington (1889); he edited an edition of the works of Hamilton (9 vol., 1885). As a senator he was a close friend of Theodore Roosevelt, welcomed war with Spain in 1898, and favored the acquisition of the Philippines and the development of a strong army and navy. A conservative Republican, he supported the gold standard and a high protective tariff, was a bitter opponent of President Wilson's peace policy, and, as chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, opposed U.S. entry into the League of Nations unless specified and highly limiting reservations were made to protect U.S. interests. He later opposed U.S. entry into the World Court. In 1920 he was one of the group of Senators who brought about Warren G. Harding's nomination.

See his Early Memories (1913).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

See more Encyclopedia articles on: U.S. History: Biographies

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