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Carl Bosch

Bosch, Carl, 1874–1940, German chemist and engineer, Ph.D. Univ. of Leipzig, 1898. In 1899, Bosch began working as a chemist for BASF, which merged with six other German chemical firms to become I. G. Farben in 1925. He remained with the company until his death in 1940. Bosch was awarded the 1931 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Friedrich Bergius in recognition of their contributions to the invention and development of chemical high-pressure methods. Bosch is credited with collaborating in the development of the Haber-Bosch process for high-pressure synthesis of ammonia, which is used to produce fertilizers and explosives. He also developed a method for making gasoline from coal dust and hydrogen.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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