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Nabis

Nabis (näbēˈ) [key] [Heb., = prophets], a group of artists in France active during the 1890s. Paul Sérusier and Maurice Denis were the principal theorists of the group. Outstanding members were Édouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, Aristide Maillol, Félix Vallotton, and the lesser known Ker Xavier Roussel. The group held its first exhibition in 1892. Influenced by Gauguin, the Nabis developed a style characterized by flat areas of boldly juxtaposed but muted colors and heavily outlined surface patterns. They were unified by the decorative character of their work and their dislike of impressionism. After a successful show in 1899, the group gradually disbanded.

See study by C. Chassé (tr. 1969).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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