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Strike

(A). A federation of workmen to quit work unless the masters will submit to certain stated conditions. To strike is to leave off work, as stated above. (Anglo-Saxon, stric-an, to go.)

“Co-operation prevents strikes by identifying the interests of labour and capital.” —R.T. Ely: Political Economy, part iv. chap. iv. 238.

Strike

(1 syl.). Strike, but hear me! So said Themistocles with wonderful self-possession to Eurybiades, the Spartan general. The tale told by Plutarch is this: Themistocles strongly opposed the proposal of Eurybiades to quit the bay of Salamis. The hot-headed Spartan insultingly remarked that “those who in the public games rise up before the proper signal are scourged.” “True,” said Themistocles, “but those who lag behind win no laurels.” On this, Eurybiades lifted up his staff to strike him, when Themistocles earnestly but proudly exclaimed, “Strike, but hear me!”

To strike hands upon a bargain
or sírike a bargain. To confirm it by shaking or striking hands.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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