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Paris-Garden

A bear-garden; a noisy, disorderly place. In allusion to the bear-garden so called on the Thames bank-side, kept by Robert de Paris in the reign of Richard II.

“Do you take the court for a Paris-garden?” —Shakespeare: Henry VIII., v. 3.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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More on Paris-Garden from Infoplease:

  • Paris-Garden - Paris-Garden A bear-garden; a noisy, disorderly place. In allusion to the bear-garden so called on ...
  • Sackerson - Sackerson The famous bear kept at “Paris Garden” in Shakespeare's time, (See Paris ...
  • Orsin - Orsin One of the leaders of the rabble that attacked Hudibras at a bear-baiting. He was ...
  • William Shakespeare: Henry VIII, Act V, Scene IV - You'll leave your noise anon, ye rascals: do you take the court for Paris-garden? ye rude slaves, leave your gaping.
  • Dictionary of Phrase and Fable: P - Definitions, origins, and illustrative excerpts for words, phases, and literary allusions starting with "P"

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