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Lanternise

Spending one's time in learned trifles; darkening counsel by words; mystifying the more by attempting to unravel mysteries, putting truths into a lantern through which, at best, we see but darkly. When monks bring their hoods over their faces “to meditate,” they are said by the French to lanternise, because they look like the tops of lanterns; but the result of their meditations is that of a “brown study,” or “fog of sleepy thought.” (See above.)

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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More on Lanternise from Infoplease:

  • Lanternise - Lanternise Spending one's time in learned trifles; darkening counsel by words; mystifying the ...
  • Lanterns - Lanterns Authors, literary men, and other inmates of Lantern-land (q.v.). Rabelais so calls the ...
  • Dictionary of Phrase and Fable: L - Definitions, origins, and illustrative excerpts for words, phases, and literary allusions starting with "L"

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