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King

The Anglo-Saxon cyng, cyning, from cyn a nation or people, and the termination —ing, meaning “of,” as “son of,” “chief of,” etc. In Anglo-Saxon times the king was elected on the Witena-gemòt, and was therefore the choice of the nation.

The factory king.
Richard Oastler, of Bradford, the successful advocate of the “Ten Hours' Bill” (1789-1861).

Ré Galantuomo
(the gallant king), Victor Emmanuel of Italy (1820-1878)

King

A king should die standing. So said Louis XVIII. of France, in imitation of Vespasian, Emperor of Rome. (See Dying Sayings Louis XVIII.)

Like a king. When Porus, the Indian prince, was taken prisoner, Alexander asked him how he expected to be treated. “Like a king,” he replied; and Alexander made him his friend.

Pray aid of the king.
When someone, under the belief that he has a right to the land, claims rent of the king's tenants, they appeal to the sovereign, or “pray aid of the king.”

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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