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Gargamelle

(3 syl., g hard) was the wife of Grangousier, and daughter of the king of the Parpaillons (butterflies). On the day that she gave birth to Gargantua she ate sixteen quarters, two bushels, three pecks, and a pipkin of dirt, the mere remains left in the tripe which she had for supper; for, as the proverb says -

Scrape tripe as clean as e'er you can,
A tithe of filth will still remain.

Gargamelle.

Said to be meant for Anne of Brittany. She was the mother of Gargantua, in the satirical romance of Gargantua and Pantagruel', by Rabelais. Motteux, who makes “Pantagruel” to be Anthony de Bourbon, and “Gargantua” to be Henri d'Albret, says “Gargamelle” is designed for Catherine de Foix, Queen of Navarre. (Rabelais, i. 4.)

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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More on Gargamelle from Infoplease:

  • Gargamelle - Gargamelle (3 syl., g hard) was the wife of Grangousier, and daughter of the king of the ...
  • Grangousier - Grangousier (4 syl.). King of Utopia, who married, in “the vigour of his old age,” ...
  • Gargantua - Gargantua (g hard), according to Rabelais, was son of Grangousier and Gargamelle. Immediately he ...
  • Dictionary of Phrase and Fable: G - Definitions, origins, and illustrative excerpts for words, phases, and literary allusions starting with "G"

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