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Corah

in Dryden's satire of Absalom and Achitophel, is meant for Dr. Titus Oates (Numbers xvi.). North describes him as a short man, extremely ugly: if his mouth is taken for the centre, his chin, forehead, and cheek-bones would fall in the circumference.

Sunk were his eyes, his voice was harsh and loud;
Sure signs he neither choleric was, nor proud;
His long chin proved his wit; his saint-like grace
A church vermilion, and a Moses' face.
His memory, miraculously great,
Could plots, exceeding man's belief, repeat

Dryden: Absalom and Achitophel, i. 646-51.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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