| Share
 

Bran-new

or Brand-new. (Anglo-Saxon, brand, a torch.) Fire new. Shakespeare, in Love's Labour Lost, i. 1, says, “A man of fire-new words.” And again in Twelfth Night, iii. 2, “Fire-new from the mint”; and again in King Lear, v. 3, “Fire-new fortune”; and again in Richard III., act i. 3, “Your fire-new stamp of honour is scarce current.” Originally applied to metals and things manufactured in metal which shine. Subsequently applied generally to things quite new.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

More on Bran-new from Infoplease:

  • Bran-new - Bran-new or Brand-new. (Anglo-Saxon, brand, a torch.) Fire new. Shakespeare, in Love's Labour ...
  • The Elderbush - Andersen's Fairy Tales The Leap-Frog The Bell The Elderbush Once upon a time there was a little ...
  • Louisa May Alcott: Round the Fire - With the October frosts came the cheery fires in the great fireplaces; and Demi's dry pine-chips helped Dan's oak-knots to blaze royally, and go roari
  • The First of the Three Spirits - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens 1 - Marley's Ghost The Second of the Three Spirits - 3 The ...
  • Dictionary of Phrase and Fable: B - Definitions, origins, and illustrative excerpts for words, phases, and literary allusions starting with "B"

Related Content

24 X 7

Private Tutor

Click Here for Details
24 x 7 Tutor Availability
Unlimited Online Tutoring
1-on-1 Tutoring