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Belly

The belly and its members. The fable of Menenius Agrippa to the Roman people when they seceded to the Sacred Mount: “Once on a time the members refused to work for the lazy belly; but, as the supply of food was thus stopped, they found there was a necessary and mutual dependence between them.” Shakespeare introduces the fable in his Coriolanus, i. 1.

The belly has no ears.
A hungry man will not listen to advice or arguments. The Romans had the same proverb, Venter non habet aures; and in French, Ventre affamé n'a point d'oreilles.

Belly-timber
Food.

“And now, Dame Peveril, to dinner, to dinner. The old fox must have his belly-timber, though the hounds have been after him the whole day.” —Sir W. Scott. Peveril of the Peak, chap. 48.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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