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Arria

a Roman lady, the wife of Cæcina Pætus. Pætus being accused of conspiring against the Emperor Claudius was condemned to death and sent by sea to Rome. Arria accompanied him, and stabbed herself in

the boat, then presenting the dagger to her husband, she said: “Pætus, it gives no pain” (non dolet). (Pliny, vii.) Her daughter Arria, wife of Thraseas, when her husband was condemned to death by Nero, opened her veins; but Thraseas entreated her to live, for the sake of her children.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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