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Cuba

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Facts & Figures

President: Raúl Castro (2008)

Total area: 42,803 sq mi (110,860 sq km)

Population (2012 est.): 11,075,244 (growth rate: -0.12%); birth rate: 9.96/1000; infant mortality rate: 4.83/1000; life expectancy: 77.87; density per sq km: 103

Capital and largest city (2009 est.): Havana, 2,140,000

Other large cities: Santiago de Cuba, 554,400; Camagüey, 354,400; Holguin, 319,300; Guantánamo, 274,300; Santa Clara, 251,800

Monetary unit: Cuban Peso

More Facts & Figures

Flag of Cuba
Index
  1. Cuba Main Page
  2. Revolution Leader Fidel Castro Breaks Ties with U.S. and Allies Himself with the Soviet Union
  3. Bay of Pigs Disaster
  4. Soviet-Missile Crisis
  5. In Poor Health Castro Announces His Retirement
  6. Cubans Begin to Win Small Freedoms
  7. Cuba Takes Possible Steps Toward a New Leader Not Named Castro
  8. Pope Makes Long-Awaited Visit
  9. Exit Visa Requirement Is Dropped

Geography

The largest island of the West Indies group (equal in area to Pennsylvania), Cuba is also the westernmost—just west of Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic), and 90 mi (145 km) south of Key West, Fla., at the entrance to the Gulf of Mexico. The island is mountainous in the southeast and south-central area (Sierra Maestra). It is flat or rolling elsewhere. Cuba also includes numerous smaller islands, islets, and cays.

Government

Communist state.

History

Arawak (or Taino) Indians inhabiting Cuba when Columbus landed on the island in 1492 died from diseases brought by sailors and settlers. By 1511, Spaniards under Diego Velásquez had established settlements. Havana's superb harbor made it a common transit point to and from Spain.

In the early 1800s, Cuba's sugarcane industry boomed, requiring massive numbers of black slaves. A simmering independence movement turned into open warfare from 1867 to 1878. Slavery was abolished in 1886. In 1895, the poet José Marti led the struggle that finally ended Spanish rule, thanks largely to U.S. intervention in 1898 after the sinking of the battleship Maine in Havana harbor.

An 1899 treaty made Cuba an independent republic under U.S. protection. The U.S. occupation, which ended in 1902, suppressed yellow fever and brought large American investments. The 1901 Platt Amendment allowed the U.S. to intervene in Cuba's affairs, which it did four times from 1906 to 1920. Cuba terminated the amendment in 1934.

In 1933, a group of army officers, including army sergeant Fulgencio Batista, overthrew President Gerardo Machado. Batista became president in 1940, running a corrupt police state.

In 1956, Fidel Castro Ruz launched a revolution from his camp in the Sierra Maestra mountains. Castro's brother Raul and Ernesto (Ché) Guevara, an Argentine physician, were his top lieutenants. Many anti-Batista landowners supported the rebels. The U.S. ended military aid to Cuba in 1958, and on New Year's Day 1959, Batista fled into exile and Castro took over the government.

Next: Revolution Leader Fidel Castro Breaks Ties with U.S. and Allies Himself with the Soviet Union
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